We Have the Illusion of Markets

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For some of the best prices for silver and gold bullion in Singapore visit www.silverag.com.sg

Craig Hemke, who has Wall Street experience that dates back to 1990, says, “The whole thing is a charade akin to a movie set. . . . We have the illusion of markets, and that is propped up on a daily basis by the financial media who has an interest in propping it up. They parade money managers on there who have an interest in making it seem all is well because they are collecting fees. You also have the Fed pretending to be in control through their interest rate policies and trying to make it sound like the economy is doing just fine. . . .All of it is a hall of mirrors or a charade to try to convince everybody that it is all okay. When I got into this business 25 years ago, there was an actually functioning stock market . . . it was buyers and sellers, actually real people. Now, 75% of the volume of the listed stocks is done by high frequency trading computers. . . . It is a fraud, a scam and a charade.”Craig Hemke, who has Wall Street experience that dates back to 1990, says, “The whole thing is a charade akin to a movie set. . . . We have the illusion of markets, and that is propped up on a daily basis by the financial media who has an interest in propping it up. They parade money managers on there who have an interest in making it seem all is well because they are collecting fees. You also have the Fed pretending to be in control through their interest rate policies and trying to make it sound like the economy is doing just fine. . . .All of it is a hall of mirrors or a charade to try to convince everybody that it is all okay. When I got into this business 25 years ago, there was an actually functioning stock market . . . it was buyers and sellers, actually real people. Now, 75% of the volume of the listed stocks is done by high frequency trading computers. . . . It is a fraud, a scam and a charade.”

See the video here.

 

 

 

 

It’s not over….Why gold was the best buy in 2008-9 crash and will be this time too

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For some of the lowest prices for gold and silver in Singapore visit www.silverag.com.sg

From: http://www.arabianmoney.net/gold-silver/2015/08/26/why-gold-was-the-best-buy-in-2008-9-crash-and-will-be-this-time-too/

What was the best asset class to buy for the recovery that followed the 2008-9 crash in global financial markets? Step forward gold whose rise was only exceeded by silver.

Precious metals not only delivered the fastest recovery from that huge sell-off but offered increases way above the pre-crash levels. Gold tripled from its low in the crash, while silver went on to record an eight-fold increase, still just shy of its 1980 all-time high.

Deja-vu all over again

It is not hard to see history repeating itself all over again. Just look at the Chinese central bank this week cutting interest rates, just like the Fed had to do in 2008-9.

Back then that lit a fire under precious metals because of the inflation that was likely to follow. And inflation certainly did follow if you think about house prices and stock market prices but they were slower to deliver returns to investors than gold and silver up until 2011 when precious metal prices peaked.

They have now endured a four-year bear market and are perfectly positioned at much lower levels for a very strong rebound. On the other hand, global financial markets are still overvalued, even after the corrections of the past couple of months.

In that same time we have seen the gold price bottom out, advance $90 an ounce and then come back $40. All financial assets are currently very volatile but gold is still up in price and not down like stocks.

Going up or down?

The only reason that investors are hesitating to pile into precious metals is that they recall the 2008 collapse in their prices during the global financial crisis and hope that this will happen again to provide them with an even better entry point.

Will markets really be that kind to them? The prudent investor says it might be wise to start buying gold now in case it does not go down this time, and if the anti-gold camp on Wall Street has one single valid point it is that gold and stocks do not correlate.

Those Wall Street commentators dancing on the grave of gold have perhaps got the wrong funeral here: ask not for whom the bell tolls, it tolls for thee…

Paul Krugman “What Ails The World Right Now Is That Governments Aren’t Deep Enough In Debt”

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For some of the best prices for silver and gold in Singapore visit www.silverag.com.sg

From: http://www.zerohedge.com/print/512153

This was written by a Nobel prize winning economist [6]without a trace or sarcasm, irony or humor. It is excerpted, and presented without commentary.

From the NYT 

Debt Is Good

… the point simply that public debt isn’t as bad as legend has it? Or can government debt actually be a good thing?

Believe it or not, many economists argue that the economy needs a sufficient amount of public debt out there to function well. And how much is sufficient? Maybe more than we currently have. That is, there’s a reasonable argument to be made that part of what ails the world economy right now is that governments aren’t deep enough in debt.

I know that may sound crazy. After all, we’ve spent much of the past five or six years in a state of fiscal panic, with all the Very Serious People declaring that we must slash deficits and reduce debt now now now or we’ll turn into Greece, Greece I tell you.

But the power of the deficit scolds was always a triumph of ideology over evidence, and a growing number of genuinely serious people — most recently Narayana Kocherlakota, the departing president of the Minneapolis Fed — are making the case that we need more, not less, government debt.

Why?

One answer is that issuing debt is a way to pay for useful things, and we should do more of that when the price is right. The United States suffers from obvious deficiencies in roads, rails, water systems and more; meanwhile, the federal government can borrow at historically low interest rates. So this is a very good time to be borrowing and investing in the future, and a very bad time for what has actually happened: an unprecedented decline in public construction spending adjusted for population growth and inflation.

Beyond that, those very low interest rates are telling us something about what markets want. I’ve already mentioned that having at least some government debt outstanding helps the economy function better. How so? The answer, according to M.I.T.’s Ricardo Caballero and others, is that the debt of stable, reliable governments provides “safe assets” that help investors manage risks, make transactions easier and avoid a destructive scramble for cash.

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[L]ow interest rates, Mr. Kocherlakota declares, are a problem. When interest rates on government debt are very low even when the economy is strong, there’s not much room to cut them when the economy is weak, making it much harder to fight recessions.  There may also be consequences for financial stability: Very low returns on safe assets may push investors into too much risk-taking — or for that matter encourage another round of destructive Wall Street hocus-pocus.

What can be done? Simply raising interest rates, as some financial types keep demanding (with an eye on their own bottom lines), would undermine our still-fragile recovery. What we need are policies that would permit higher rates in good times without causing a slump. And one such policy, Mr. Kocherlakota argues, would be targeting a higher level of debt.

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Now, in principle the private sector can also create safe assets, such as deposits in banks that are universally perceived as sound….

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At this point we stopped reading.